Romeo and Juliet

One of Shakespeare’s earliest plays, Romeo and Juliet has become an iconic romantic tragedy, as two young lovers fall victim to family hatred and cruel destiny.

Tickets: $10; available at the ARTS Project box office, 519-642-2767.

December
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          1. 8
            1. 8:00 pm
              Romeo and Juliet

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2011/12/romeo-and-juliet-4/ for details.

              Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

          2. 9
            1. 8:00 pm
              Romeo and Juliet

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2011/12/romeo-and-juliet-4/ for details.

              Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

          3. 10
            1. 2:00 pm
              Romeo and Juliet

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2011/12/romeo-and-juliet-4/ for details.

              Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

            2. 8:00 pm
              Romeo and Juliet

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2011/12/romeo-and-juliet-4/ for details.

              Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

          1 thought on “Romeo and Juliet”

          1. Peter J. says:

            An interesting take on the play, with some nice work by young London actors. Colt Forgrave and Sarah Stanton are effective and believable as the eponymous couple, who have a much more direct and modern relationship than in other versions I’ve seen. James Diamond (Friar Laurence), Shree Ziradkar (Lord Montague) and Corrinne LePage play strong supporting roles—LePage’s opinionated, funny performance of the Nurse is a particular highlight.

            The minimal set and props don’t really convey the desired “steampunk” approach, often characterized by anachronistic technology; it did come across to some extent in the Victorian costumes, but had the director’s notes not mentioned it I would have simply chalked them up to a simple time-shift.

            The instrumental electronic version of Moves Like Jagger is a fun inclusion in the party scene where Romeo and Juliet meet; as far as I can tell it’s uncredited, so I’m curious to know if it’s original to this production or an existing piece.

            Although there are rough parts early on, overall it’s a very good first production for London Youth Theatre. The group, a sister organization to one formed in Kitchener-Waterloo in 2008, is casting Macbeth in March.

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