Conversations Never Had

For when we lose people and don’t have the chance – for when we are misunderstood or unheard – our words can be so lost on you, so let us express through movement.

May
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          1. 8:15 pm
            Conversations Never Had

            See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/conversations-never-had/ for details.

            Location: Palace Theatre

        June
        1. Sun
        2. Mon
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        1. 1
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            1. 5:30 pm
              Conversations Never Had

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/conversations-never-had/ for details.

              Location: Palace Theatre

          2. 3
            1. 4
              1. 8:00 pm
                Conversations Never Had

                See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/conversations-never-had/ for details.

                Location: Palace Theatre

            2. 5
              1. 6
                1. 9:45 pm
                  Conversations Never Had

                  See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/conversations-never-had/ for details.

                  Location: Palace Theatre

              2. 7
                1. 8
                  1. 9
                    1. 9:45 pm
                      Conversations Never Had

                      See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/conversations-never-had/ for details.

                      Location: Palace Theatre

                  2. 10
                    1. 7:00 pm
                      Conversations Never Had

                      See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/conversations-never-had/ for details.

                      Location: Palace Theatre

                  Presented by Breath in Mvmt

                  Location: Palace Theatre

                  4 thoughts on “Conversations Never Had”

                  1. Peter Janes
                    Reviewer
                    says:

                    The first time I went to a Breath in Mvmt performance was mostly to check off another show in my quest to see everything in the London Fringe Theatre Festival. I mean, it’s a dance show… what’s it doing in a theatre festival? And I don’t know anything about dance.

                    I still don’t know anything about dance, except that it absolutely belongs in this festival. And seeing Breath in Mvmt’s new show is no longer something to cross off a list, it’s something I anticipate. Conversations Never Had exceeded my expectations.

                    I’ve raved in prior years about the raw, emotional performances that the company gives, and I could do so again. Instead, I’ll simply highlight the free nature of the dancers’ performances, which are stylistically consistent without being the same; the sense of a theme and variations is echoed in several ways in the production, particularly in their costumes. The exception to the pattern is choreographer and lead dancer Melisa Boose, who provides a counterpoint throughout that’s still integrated as part of the whole. I was also pleased with their use of light to generate atmosphere, from silhouettes (projected and on stage) to “gobo” stencils, which I don’t think they’ve incorporated to this extent in the past.

                    Dance isn’t scary, and it’s not “difficult”. There are a number of dance shows, and shows that incorporate dance, at this year’s Fringe; don’t hesitate to see any of them, and definitely don’t hesitate to see this one.

                    *****

                  2. Jay Ménard
                    Reviewer
                    says:

                    London Fringe — Conversations Never Had Shouts Greatness from the Stage

                    Conversations Never Had, performed by Breath in Mvmt and choreographed by Melisa Boose, is a testament to the power of dance and the power of visual storytelling through movement. And it accomplishes this through a performance that’s at once soul wrenching and emotionally uplifting.

                    Permit me to repeat myself a bit, but Breath in Mvmt’s style is the embodiment of “Jolie Laide” — a French concept describing something that is beautiful in its ugliness. I described their 2015 show in similar terms and it is more true than ever before. That’s not to say that the performance is ugly in any way, but it’s raw, it’s visceral, and Boose’s choreography extends beyond the mere crafting of steps, but into pouring the dancer’s soul onto the stage.

                    The “ugliness” is a style that embraces the conventions of contemporary dance, then twists and turns them into a result that transcends the style.

                    The choreography is almost savage at times — bodies move and contort not in the smooth, linear ways that one tends to associate with contemporary, but in a much more dynamic, almost guttural manner. Bodies twist and contort, they fold and collapse, and they press into the stage in a way that suggests the actors are going to push through to the other side — confined not by the physics of the stage but only by the extent of their vision.

                    But the moments of rawness are counterbalanced by equal moments of grace and beauty — often in the duration of one move. The production, an expression of words through movement, offers a beautiful expression of contrasting emotions and states: strong and weak, vanity and sensitivity, confidence and fear, vixen and Earth mother. The movements range from purposeful and rigid to soft and languid, anguish to sheer joy.

                    The show features an incredible depth of choreography that’s visually appealing. There are moments when each of the women are performing the same series of movements, but at different points — and it works. It creates a visual element that’s at once visually striking and invites you to look deeper.

                    The women work wonderfully together and command equal respect. But there are some moments, brilliantly designed, to put the focus on one dance — and one emotion. There is one sequence where Jess Ireland is struggling to find her voice – literally reaching down into her mouth to pull forth a word, a cry, a scream. The other dancers move to block her way, prevent her from expressing herself, but she is touchingly, lovingly supported and pushed forth by Jodi Hall. The struggle in and of itself is both beautiful and haunting to watch.

                    Conversations Never Had proves that we can speak without words. Thoughts, feelings, and emotions can be expressed through movement and dance. And Breath in Mvmt proves itself adept at translating feelings into dance — and this production is a testament to their skill, talent, and heart.

                    *****

                  3. Melony Holt
                    Reviewer
                    says:

                    Conversation Never Had was more than just a company dance show. The impact of this show is so intense throughout the entire show and I felt so moved at moments and deeply connected to the message of the dances.

                    There was something that broke inside of me when Jess Ireland did her solo piece. There are moments throughout the show that are sure to resonate with all members of the audience. For me, this piece was particularly poignant as it wasn’t so long ago that I shared those emotions on a daily basis, dealing with anxiety and depression.

                    There is a story crafted by choreographer Melisa Boose and Breath in Mvnt that flows through the show, but this is a show that’s going to allow the viewers to interpret it in their own way. The movements on the stage will lead to a lot of self reflection among the audience members.

                    The songs and styling of the dancers were beautiful and the use of light throughout the show as well helped to tell the stories.

                    *****

                  4. Sue Hughes says:

                    Wonderful show! I would definitely see this group again.

                  Comments are closed.