I Sound Like Mom

The age old story of resistance, denial, rebellion and struggle as one woman turns into the only person she never wanted to be. Join Meghan on this personal, heartbreaking and hilarious journey of becoming the strongest woman she knows: her mother.

May
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  1. 28
    1. 29
      1. 30
        1. 31
          1. 6:30 pm
            I Sound Like Mom

            See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/i-sound-like-mom/ for details.

            Location: Procunier Hall

        June
        1. Sun
        2. Mon
        3. Tue
        4. Wed
        5. Thu
        6. Fri
        7. Sat
        1. 1
          1. 2
            1. 6:00 pm
              I Sound Like Mom

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/i-sound-like-mom/ for details.

              Location: Procunier Hall

          2. 3
            1. 4
              1. 1:30 pm
                I Sound Like Mom

                See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/i-sound-like-mom/ for details.

                Location: Procunier Hall

            2. 5
              1. 6
                1. 5:30 pm
                  I Sound Like Mom

                  See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/i-sound-like-mom/ for details.

                  Location: Procunier Hall

              2. 7
                1. 8
                  1. 8:00 pm
                    I Sound Like Mom

                    See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/i-sound-like-mom/ for details.

                    Location: Procunier Hall

                2. 9
                  1. 10
                    1. 4:00 pm
                      I Sound Like Mom

                      See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/i-sound-like-mom/ for details.

                      Location: Procunier Hall

                  By

                  Presented by Squirrels at War

                  Location: Procunier Hall

                  Cast

                  Artistic Credits

                  Direction:

                  8 thoughts on “I Sound Like Mom”

                  1. JD says:

                    I saw the first show on Wed night. I’ve always thought Meghan was amazingly talented, this show proves it! I laughed through the funny parts and left wishing my family was as cool as hers!

                  2. Meghan Brown’s autobiographical play doesn’t pull any punches. The names aren’t changed to protect the innocent—or the guilty, except in one specific case—and it’s as much a confessional as it is a “love letter” to her mother, Patty.

                    In different hands I Sound Like Mom might lean toward “theatre as therapy”. But the younger Brown knows what she’s doing, and tells her story with truthful abandon. There are no cheap shots, and no cheap laughs; an audience full of members of the London theatre community will add a knowing chuckle at one point, but it’s one that she’s earned. Meghan-the-actor gives an engaging, personable, genuine accounting of Meghan-the-daughter—take that, past critics!—that rarely feels scripted or “performed”.

                    If her daughter is any indication, Pat Brown is a unique, funny, intelligent, and caring woman. (Her presence in the audience for the debut performance is proof!) It’s not just a voice they have in common.

                    *****

                  3. JD says:

                    I loved this show. I’ve always thought Meghan was an extremely talented actress, but she also wrote and directed herself – a new type of triple threat! See this show – you won’t regret it.

                    1. Meghan says:

                      Hi JD, thank you for the love but I didn’t direct it myself. The very talented Paige Miller did and I couldn’t have done it without her.

                  4. Shelley carr
                    Reviewer
                    says:

                    This production is comedic but touching ode to the playwright’s own mother. The stories are the stories we all have of our parents. The tug and pull of independence. The need for support and unconditional love when things get tough. The moment when we realize that no matter who we are, our parents love us.
                    Throughout, we see the character grow into the fantastic woman her mom always wanted to be. But we also see Meghan’s mom grow as well. To see that what makes her happy is not for everyone.
                    Technically this was an excellent production. The artist has a strong sense of what works and does not work in a production. And she was an excellent storyteller. But as a reviewer, I sensed that Meghan has even better stories to tell and we look forward to seeing and hearing them in the future
                    A lovely recounting of the growth of two very strong and funny women.

                    ***

                  5. Steve Seguin says:

                    To me, the best one person shows feel like a conversation and not a performance. Yes, you know there is a memorized script back there and you know everything is theatrically planned out, but in all of that seems to disappear. Somehow it’s just you and the performer having a conversation in a crowded room. Meghan achieved this in I Sound Like Mom.
                    I’ve seen a lot of well-crafted shows at this Fringe – scripts and performances that were skillfully delivered and hit all the right nerves, but I don’t think the performers broke an artistic sweat.
                    Meghan Brown, on the other hand, was lifting above her weight. She ripped something out of herself artistically and gave it to her audience. And she pulled it off. The show is funny, and well-written, and endearing.
                    There is always one show that stands out for me at every Fringe. I suspect this will be the one for me this year.

                  6. Jay Ménard
                    Reviewer
                    says:

                    I Sound Like Mom – Honestly Growing into Self-Discovery

                    Meghan Brown, early on in her one-woman show I Sound Like Mom, makes an offhand comment about her acting ability, suggesting that some critics may not have held her such high esteem. Well, with her latest Fringe venture, if Brown isn’t being completely open, honest, and exposed to the world, then she has nothing to worry about from the critics because she’s clearly the greatest actor we’ve seen in a long time.

                    Simply put, I Sound Like Mom is Brown sticking a pen in her heart and spilling it out onto the page. And then she stands before us all, with nothing to hide behind and no mask to wear, and tells the story of her life and her relationship with her mom. The good, the bad, and the delayed realization that being like her mother is actually a good thing.

                    Along the way, we’re treated to a handful of stories — many funny and a few heart-wrenching — as she explains the push/pull, love/hate (but always rooted in a foundation of love) relationship with her mother.

                    Often, in these autobiographical productions, the writer will portray themselves as an idealized version of who they were — more precocious, more clever, more intuitive, or even badder than they were, just to make themselves seem more important to the narrative. With Brown, we don’t get that at all — she tells her stories with an intense self-understanding and realization of her actions and her behaviour. She, thanks to the passage of time, understands her motivations and, more importantly, understands the motivations of her mother. She’s not playing a role; she’s not amplifying her youthful character.

                    She’s being honest. Brutally honest.

                    Or, as I said, she’s an incredibly talented actress to make me believe she was.

                    Towards the end, we see how everything that Meghan’s mom Pat has said, done, and taught over the years manifests itself exactly when it’s needed — when Brown’s at her lowest point after a particularly devastating relationship and breakup. Brown realizes she sounds like her mom and it’s a good thing — because it’s the sound of a strong, confident woman standing up for herself. It’s the sound of a woman only wanting what’s best for her daughter. And it’s the sound of love.

                    I Sound Like Mom is the sound of honesty. And it’s a powerful, wonderful, and fearlessly exposed story of Brown’s life. If the show is a gift for Brown’s mom, it’s also one that’s a gift for this year’s Fringe viewers.

                    *****

                  7. Melony Holt
                    Reviewer
                    says:

                    Many women, growing up, have a fear of becoming their mothers. Meghan Brown’s I Sound Like Mom shows the realization that many of us eventually have that sounding like our mothers isn’t always a bad thing.

                    I Sound Like Mom is an outstanding and engaging production. Brown is so emotional and raw in her storytelling that it draws the audience in and has them laughing and crying along with her.

                    With just Brown, a stool, a wine glass, and a slowly emptying bottle of white wine on stage, the audience is able to focus on the struggle Brown has had over the years, perceiving herself as being a failure in her mother’s eyes.

                    In the end, Brown realizes that her mother’s being “hard” on her was just her way of trying to ensure her daughter would be happy in the long run. And her messages pay off as Brown channels her mother’s strength to get through an extremely hard breakup.

                    Brown has such a talent to switch from emotion to emotion in a blink of an eye. And this story is so much more than just a coming-of-age tale — it culminates in Brown’s realization that her mother is only human. A human who is just as confused and who makes just as many mistakes as anyone else.

                    Many people in the audience, myself included, will see themselves in Brown. We’ve gone through the teenage drama, we’ve all rebelled in one way or another against our parents, and we’ve all learned, through maturity, that the decisions our parents made when we were younger weren’t “stupid” but rather in our best interest. And that every decision is made with our best interests in mind.

                    *****

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