Mike Delamont: Mama’s Boy

The emotional, powerful, and heartbreaking true story of family, music, addiction, and love from one of the fringe’s most popular performers.

May
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          1. 7:00 pm
            Mike Delamont: Mama’s Boy

            See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/mike-delamont-mamas-boy/ for details.

            Location: McManus Stage

        June
        1. Sun
        2. Mon
        3. Tue
        4. Wed
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        1. 1
          1. 2
            1. 8:45 pm
              Mike Delamont: Mama’s Boy

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/mike-delamont-mamas-boy/ for details.

              Location: McManus Stage

          2. 3
            1. 6:00 pm
              Mike Delamont: Mama’s Boy

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/mike-delamont-mamas-boy/ for details.

              Location: McManus Stage

          3. 4
            1. 3:00 pm
              Mike Delamont: Mama’s Boy

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/mike-delamont-mamas-boy/ for details.

              Location: McManus Stage

          4. 5
            1. 6
              1. 5:30 pm
                Mike Delamont: Mama’s Boy

                See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/mike-delamont-mamas-boy/ for details.

                Location: McManus Stage

            2. 7
              1. 8:45 pm
                Mike Delamont: Mama’s Boy

                See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/mike-delamont-mamas-boy/ for details.

                Location: McManus Stage

            3. 8
              1. 9
                1. 10

                  Location: McManus Stage

                  7 thoughts on “Mike Delamont: Mama’s Boy”

                  1. Lara Rae - CBC says:

                    5 STARS

                    Workaholic Fringe fave Mike Delamont takes off the dress and drops the Scottish accent to share his real life with us. Or, more accurately, he shares the life of his mother.
                    ​Delamont has an almost supernatural gift for storytelling — no bland synopsis can convey the power of this simple tale of his relationship with the person most central in his life.
                    I found it more authentically funny than his God is a Scottish Drag Queen character, and found the dramatic sections to be almost painfully raw. A spectacular evening of theatre.

                    One word sums up the theme of this magnificent work: forgiveness. Bring Kleenex.

                  2. Randall King - Winnipeg Free Press says:

                    4 STARS

                    Usually protected by the fringe-stage persona of a certain Scottish Drag Queen, Victoria’s Mike Delamont offers the wrenchingly revealing story of his relationship with his mother. Among other revelations, Delamont was adopted as a baby from Winnipeg (“I left early”). His adoptive father died when he was seven, leaving him in the sole custody of a mom who, by degrees, lost herself to alcoholism over the course of Delamont’s formative years. Even so, she found it in herself to support the awkward youth’s absorption into theatre, including paying for singing lessons, though Delamont has remained shy about sharing that particular talent.

                    As any fan of God Is a Scottish Drag Queen knows, Delamont isn’t too shy anymore. His memoir, which pretty much alternates between the comic and the tragic, is funny and moving, earning a standing ovation on its Saturday evening debut. And as a matter of fact, he has a lovely singing voice.

                  3. ORLANDO SENTINEL says:

                    With this unabashed reputation, he demonstrates a great deal of courage as his un-costumed, authentic self in “Mama’s Boy.” This show is about as different as you could get from the over-the top comedy we’ve come to expect. It is the deeply personal story of his childhood and the turmoil of his mother’s descent into alcoholism after his father’s untimely death.

                    Delamont talks plainly, openly and often lovingly about his relationship with his mother. In spite of the safety net of aunts, friends and foster care that likely saved his life, there was always the lack of the thing he wanted and needed most: a mother who could take care of him, rather than the unreliable woman who required his care.

                    A less-skilled storyteller could easily have turned this into a tale of self-pity. He could have dwelt on all the things his mother didn’t do or shouldn’t have done. Instead, his gentle humor and music are an unflinching tribute to the woman he loved, flaws and all. If you don’t tear up, you’re just not listening.

                    “Mike Delamont: Mama’s Boy” is the kind of story your mind will return to, time after time. It is simple. It is exquisite. His Mama would have been proud.

                  4. Jay Ménard
                    Reviewer
                    says:

                    Delamont’s Dropped “God” But Shows Much More Soul

                    By Jay Menard

                    For years, Mike Delamont has elicited tears from his audience — tears of laughter and tears of joy. As the cross-dressing deity with a brogue, Delamont has delighted fans and sent them home with a smile on their lips and (unfortunately) that damn Proclaimers’ song in their hearts.

                    Delamont again elicits a strong reaction with his new show, Mike Delamont: Mama’s Boy — but the tears are of sadness, commiseration, and pathos. And as he finishes with a mournful rendition of The Nylon’s Rock and Roll Lullabye, the audience is left with a feeling of connection, appreciation, and a strong desire to call your mom.

                    Delamont has dominated Fringes with his God is a Scottish Drag Queen, but strips down — both literally and figuratively in this show. No wig, makeup, and frock, Delamont takes to the stage in nothing more than a black t-shirt and jeans. The accent is gone, but what’s left is a pure, sincere, and painfully honest voice.

                    He recounts the story of his relationship with his mother. An alcoholic who raised him alone after his father passes away when he’s seven. Delamont talks about how the two of them take turns taking care of each other — the pejorative nature of “Mama’s Boy” balanced by the sincere appreciation he has for a woman who tried her hardest and loved her strongest.

                    Of course, Delamont infuses the story with humour — but just enough to break the tension and assure the audience that everything’s going to be OK. But there were tears. The end of the play is punctuated by several sniffles in the crowd and copious wiping of eyes.

                    This show is no God. But in many ways it’s better, more honest, and touching. It’s still very funny, but it’s strength is its incredible poignancy. It’s an absolutely beautiful show.

                    Delamont’s Mama’s Boy may not be based on religion like his previous efforts, but this show has so much more soul.

                    *****

                  5. Joe Belanger - London Free Press says:

                    There’s no power suit, no bob-cut wig and no pumps.

                    There’s no Scottish brogue and there is no God standing in front of an audience.

                    But there is Mike Delamont.

                    The same comic actor who brought us God Is a Scottish Drag Queen is back in London at McManus Stage for London Fringe with Mama’s Boy.

                    This is no lighthearted look at the world through the eyes of God.

                    This is real — Delamont’s life growing up with his adoptive, alcoholic mother in Victoria, B.C.

                    The comic is always present and Delamont uses his comedic talents that set the audience up with laughter for some harsh, brutally honest, poignant, sad, disturbing and, at times, shocking moments in a life that was, incredibly, filled with love.

                    Delamont walks onto the stage, his usual, personable self and says: “This is my own story and I’ll try to tell it as truthfully as I can.”

                    This is so different from the Delamont Londoners have come to love, yet so much the same.

                    There’s the same relaxed, confident delivery from the six-foot- seven man with that knowing twinkle in his eye that he’s going to make you laugh.

                    And he does make us laugh, belly laughs at times, like the time his mother, June, became frustrated while trying to discipline her son, then just in Grade 9.

                    “It’s hard to discipline someone when you’re yelling into their belly button,” recalled Delamont, who then stumbled back as if she’d just smacked him in the head.

                    “She says, ‘There.’ And she walks away.”

                    It’s little stories and the way he tells them that makes this such as compelling show.

                    There’s the death of his father, Mike’s physical and personal growth through high school, and then he tells you a story about his mom peeing in bed, falling down and other situations children shouldn’t have to see, cope with or handle.

                    First and foremost, Delamont is very talented story teller. His story is so beautifully structured it carries the audience along quickly and clearly.

                    It’s riveting from beginning to end.

                    Mama’s Boy is a disturbing yet somehow inspiring story about a son’s love for his mother and a mother’s love for a son.

                  6. Melony Holt
                    Reviewer
                    says:

                    Mama’s Boy is an incredibly touching, true story of the love of a mother told through the eyes of her child, Mike Delamont. And if that name seems familiar to you, it may be because Delamont has frequently graced London’s stages as God, the Scottish Drag Queen.

                    This time around he is doing a show that is completely different. Set with a stripped down stage Delamont is able to focus on the story of his mother and his life.

                    His storytelling is so natural and conversational that one might be tempted to interject to ask a question as if having a conversation with an old friend (during the showing I attended, one person actually did — quick note: don’t do it please. It’s not improv or interactive theatre.)

                    Throughout the show Delamont sings to illustrate the tenderness of the moments shared between the two and, of course, he has such a beautiful voice. This story is raw and real, and at moments I could not hold back tears. And I wasn’t alone. There were many sets of misty eyes throughout the McManus.

                    *****

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