Woody Sed

Woody Sed, a new play about the life and times of Woody Guthrie and the songs he sang about them. Featuring 19 songs, Woody Sed offers a cascade of 25 colorful characters, all bundled up in a true to life tale.

May
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          1. 8:00 pm
            Woody Sed

            See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/woody-sed/ for details.

            Location: Procunier Hall

        June
        1. Sun
        2. Mon
        3. Tue
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        1. 1
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              1. 7:15 pm
                Woody Sed

                See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/woody-sed/ for details.

                Location: Procunier Hall

            2. 4
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                1. 6
                  1. 8:30 pm
                    Woody Sed

                    See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/woody-sed/ for details.

                    Location: Procunier Hall

                2. 7
                  1. 5:00 pm
                    Woody Sed

                    See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/woody-sed/ for details.

                    Location: Procunier Hall

                3. 8
                  1. 9
                    1. 6:30 pm
                      Woody Sed

                      See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/woody-sed/ for details.

                      Location: Procunier Hall

                  2. 10
                    1. 6:00 pm
                      Woody Sed

                      See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/05/woody-sed/ for details.

                      Location: Procunier Hall

                  Presented by Two Dollar Shoes

                  Location: Procunier Hall

                  6 thoughts on “Woody Sed”

                  1. Tom Eremondi says:

                    Review: Woody Sed
                    By Tom Eremondi, TheStarPhoenix

                    Five stars out of five
                    One might expect a play about dustbowl balladeer Woody Guthrie to be, um, dry. Woody Sed is anything but. Thomas Jones’ performance of his own play is an enthralling biography of the legendary folksinger.
                    Jones begins by lying on the floor while writing lyrics for This Land Is Your Land. In mere seconds, he captures the master singer/songwriter’s character while winning the hearts of the audience.
                    The story intensifies as we view personal tragedies and demons that Guthrie faced. These experiences coloured his character, and, more importantly, his music. We also view Guthrie as he struggles with the progressive disease, Huntington’s chorea.
                    Jones brilliantly encapsulates a storied life into a Fringe nutshell. We learn so much, it’s hard to believe the show is just an hour long.
                    As good as the writing is, his performance is absolutely unforgettable. In addition to Guthrie, Jones plays about two dozen other characters, easily using facial gestures and speech mannerisms to make each one distinct.
                    He also has the pipes to match, thrilling the audience with classic tunes like Reuben James, Ain’t Got No Home, Why Oh Why, and Bound For Glory.
                    Finally, Jones nails the tragedy – Guthrie’s depression over the loss of a daughter, his slide into alcoholism and the decline of his health. It’s the most powerful performance and captivating Fringe play this reviewer has seen. Simply put, Woody Sed is pure magnificence.

                  2. Colin McLlean says:

                    WOODY SED

                    Colin McLean: Edmonton Sun

                    —Sun Rating: 5 Suns out of 5

                    Woody Guthrie was the godfather of 20th-century folk music.
                    He died in 1967 of Huntington’s Disease, but for 15 long years, his room in the Brooklyn State Hospital became a mecca for every wannabe folksinger from Burl Ives to Pete Seeger to Bob Dylan.
                    Guthrie’s songs included This Land is Your Land, Goodnight Irene and So Long It’s Been Good to Know Ya.
                    Guthrie was the real thing. He was born in Oklahoma, travelled to California during the dirty ’30s, picked up his guitar and wrote about the terrible times the Okies were having in the land of eternal sunshine.
                    He wrote songs of protest against racism and social injustice. His famous slogan, “This machine kills fascists,” was pencilled on his well-travelled guitar.
                    Sed Woody, “All you can write is what you see.”
                    Guthrie’s Dust Bowl Ballads were recorded for the Library of Congress and became the basis of a famous ballet by Martha Graham and he was a star on the radio.
                    Guthrie was the original “ramblin’ man,” wandering from flea-bag hotels in New York to the hobo camps of California and singing his songs for anyone who would listen.
                    All the while, he was living a life as grim as any Greek tragedy. He battled alcoholism and the threat of the disease that finally ravaged his body and killed him. His mother went crazy, his father burned to death – in fact many of those he loved died horribly.
                    For those who remember, he was Arlo Guthrie’s (Alice’s Restaurant) dad.
                    In Woody Sed, balladeer/writer/performer Thomas Jones brings Woody to singular life.
                    Jones is a natural storyteller who peoples his tales with vibrant portrayals of Guthrie and his friends, switching character as smoothly as he changes chords on his guitar. Sailors, Okies, hoboes, radio personalities, bigots, black blues shouters, effete dancers, farmers and kids all make an appearance.
                    Every once in a while, Jones gets out his guitar and sings one of Woody’s songs – some well known – others not.
                    You don’t have to be a folky to enjoy this show.
                    With the hand clappin’ songs and simple folksy approach, the engaging Jones summons back the genial spirit of ol’ Woody for one more concert.

                  3. JZ says:

                    Uptown Magazine – Winnipeg’s Online Source for Arts, Entertainment & News

                    A
                    Woody Sed
                    Theatre Bagger
                    Vancouver’s Thomas Jones tackles the stranger-than-fiction life story of folk legend Woody Guthrie in this ambitious one-man show – and it was easily one of the best at the Fest. From his early days as a rail-rider learning traditional folk songs from migrant workers during the Depression to his heydey in 1940s New York City, Jones paints a vivid and intimate picture of the Dust Bowl troubadour – right down to his struggle with alcoholism and losing battle with Huntington’s disease. A collection of well-known and obscure Guthrie tunes punctuates the journey, and Jones proves himself a deft musician. Still, it’s the acting here that makes this show truly impressive, with Jones moving expertly from character to character, offering up well-considered and surprisingly subtle performances of key players in Guthrie’s life – Bob Dylan, Matt Jennings and Guthrie’s three wives among them. Touching, funny, and full of heartbreak, Woody Sed is a powerful piece delivered by a powerhouse talent.
                    – JZ

                  4. Shelley carr
                    Reviewer
                    says:

                    This deftly woven story of Woody Guthrie and the many personalities in his life is truly a treat. The story follows the rough and tumble life of Guthrie through story and song. The artist portrays multiple characters who interact with Guthrie in his life.
                    Technically, the lighting music and staging were excellent. Fantastic to see such a professional, excellent production at this year’s Fringe.
                    You cannot help tapping your toes to the music to the full out sing-a-long near the end. Even if you know nothing about folk music or the stories of Woody Guthrie, you should not miss “Woody Sed”.

                    *****

                  5. Susan Mitchell says:

                    Orlando Sentinel
                    By Susan Mitchell

                    It has been 50 years since Woody Guthrie’s death, yet we still recognize his name and celebrate his songs. Now we have an opportunity to learn more about the man whose guitar displayed the message “This machine kills fascism.”
                    In his portrayal as Guthrie, Thomas Jones entertains with songs such as “This Land is Your Land,” “Greenback Dollar” and Guthrie’s version of “This Train.” He has a good voice (probably better than Guthrie’s, in fact) and encourages the audience to sing along with the better-known tunes.
                    But “Woody Sed” is far more than a playlist of the music that shaped the folk-song era. With a change of face, posture and voice, Jones introduces the people of Guthrie’s life: people who supported him, who exploited him, and who loved him. It is through these stories that we understand the heart of the man and his work.
                    There is also an unflinching recognition of Guthrie’s personal demons. Alcoholism, neglect of family, and carelessness with money affected him deeply. Yet he is still a hero. He saw injustice and used his voice to empower people to fight back.
                    The Fringe Factor: You can’t help but admire Thomas Jones’s remarkable energy. The characters he creates change rapidly and often, and he uses their words to great advantage. It’s a carefully crafted show that all can understand and enjoy.
                    Curtain Call: Jones reminds us that Guthrie said “all you can write is what you see.” Guthrie saw a lot: poverty, racism, exploitation and tragedies. This show helps us view the world through his eyes, and to take to heart the meaning of his music.

                  6. Jay Ménard
                    Reviewer
                    says:

                    Woody Sed

                    Woody Sed examines the life and times of Woody Guthrie, his experiences, and the songs that were inspired by them. Thomas Jones does an admirable job trying to embody a couple of dozen characters who come in and out of the noted wanderer’s life.

                    It’s a warts-and-all look at Guthrie, from his early dust bowl days to his eventual silencing from Huntington’s Disease. Along the way, we travel along with Guthrie as he moves west, leaving families and wives in his wake, en route to New York. He gets introduced to communism and develops his voice — one that’s eventually silenced by Huntington’s.

                    There are a lot of characters in this 60-minute play and Jones gamely tries to give each and every one his or her own flavour and depth. Some work better than others, but overall it’s an entertaining presentation of Guthrie’s life and music.

                    The music, and Jones’ interpretation of it, are the clear highlights of the play. Jones is clearly very comfortable with a guitar and moves from speaking, to strumming, to singing, and back with ease and dexterity. It’s a joy to watch, even if the play is, at times, uneven.

                    For fans of Woody Guthrie, Woody Sed is a must see. For others, it’s a pleasant presentation, but some of the finer nuances may be lost.

                    ***

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