Delirium

The ridiculous, true story of a search for meaning amidst love, loss, and butterflies at The Top of the World.

June
  1. Sun
  2. Mon
  3. Tue
  4. Wed
  5. Thu
  6. Fri
  7. Sat
  1. 1
    1. 2
      1. 9:30 pm
        Delirium

        See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/delirium/ for details.

        Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

    2. 3
      1. 4
        1. 2:00 pm
          Delirium

          See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/delirium/ for details.

          Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

      2. 5
        1. 6:30 pm
          Delirium

          See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/delirium/ for details.

          Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

      3. 6
        1. 7
          1. 8:00 pm
            Delirium

            See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/delirium/ for details.

            Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

        2. 8
          1. 9
            1. 5:00 pm
              Delirium

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/delirium/ for details.

              Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

          2. 10
            1. 9:00 pm
              Delirium

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/delirium/ for details.

              Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

          3 thoughts on “Delirium”

          1. clara.madrenas
            Subscriber
            says:

            Delirium is a storytelling show about love, loss and whether or not the universe is paying any attention. This collection of stories told on a bare stage by a dynamic performer take you through the Toronto airport through to the deserts of Burning Man and the mountains of Mexico, thematically weaving seemingly disconnected stories together expertly. It’s a funny show but it doesn’t stop there; moments are intermittently heartbreaking and inspiring–all the more impressive given the simplicity of the show’s format. Maybe all of the anecdotes don’t hang together perfectly, but the performance is at once honest, sincere, and hilarious–worth paying attention to, even if the universe doesn’t always.

            ****

          2. D. Kelly says:

            Delirium is a trilogy of Dockery’s life experiences that I thoroughly enjoyed. His recounting of falling in love (an ensuing marriage proposal); a searing experience at Burning Man and lastly my favourite the life and death of the monarch butterfly encompassed the challenges and frailties of the human condition combining humour, tragedy and a range of emotions in between. He has the unique ability to elicit pathos from the listener as his performance turns quickly from moment to moment. Well done!

          3. Jay Ménard
            Reviewer
            says:

            Delirium Expertly Finds Meaning, Connections in Life

            Martin Dockery’s Delirium, which closed the Fringe Festival last night, is a fast-paced, energetic, and hilarious one-man show that takes topics as diverse as immigration, Burning Man, and Monarch butterflies, and finds the interconnectedness and meaning in between them.

            Dockery is a gifted storyteller. Alone, on an empty stage, he spends an hour captivating the audience with three seemingly separate tales. The first deals with his proposal to his partner Vanessa after dealing with immigration at Pearson International Airport in Toronto; the second is the tale of an encounter he had at Burning Man, prompted by a restaurant idea he had at the festival; and the final story is an airplane encounter he had following the death of his beloved dog, prompted by a seat mix-up.

            Though the stories seem disconnected — and for much of the play, they’re intentionally left that way — they’re wrapped up and tied together beautifully in the end. Dockery masterfully lays the foundations for the conclusion, expertly uses call-backs to earlier statements, and shows that these seemingly independent stories are all part of a larger connection.

            Dockery expends a tremendous amount of energy on the stage and it’s infectious. As an audience member, you’re swept along as he paces and prowls the stage. He illustrates the story with hands that dance through the air and with a body that twists, contorts, and moves as the tales are told. He uses his voice expertly, ranging from deeper, casual tones, to an almost sing-songy high pitch used to express incredulity.

            Delirium is part storytelling, part marathon, and a journey to a destination makes it all worthwhile.

            *****

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