Forget Me Not

A murder mystery set on a dementia ward from comic, poet and psychiatric nurse Rob Gee. Part social commentary, part black comedy, part Clue.

June
  1. Sun
  2. Mon
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  4. Wed
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  6. Fri
  7. Sat
  1. 1
    1. 2
      1. 5:00 pm
        Forget Me Not

        See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/forget-me-not/ for details.

        Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

    2. 3
      1. 3:30 pm
        Forget Me Not

        See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/forget-me-not/ for details.

        Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

    3. 4
      1. 5
        1. 8:00 pm
          Forget Me Not

          See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/forget-me-not/ for details.

          Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

      2. 6
        1. 5:00 pm
          Forget Me Not

          See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/forget-me-not/ for details.

          Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

      3. 7
        1. 8
          1. 8:00 pm
            Forget Me Not

            See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/forget-me-not/ for details.

            Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

        2. 9
          1. 10
            1. 6:00 pm
              Forget Me Not

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/forget-me-not/ for details.

              Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

          5 thoughts on “Forget Me Not”

          1. Kingkev says:

            I loved this great and comical play. My mom suffers from dementia and thanks to to Rob and his great performance and skill as an actor its the first time i really got to Laugh about it all . Thank YOu for that Rob. The play is excellent and full of laughs especially the mixups on many popular sayings that worked out so well. Can an ex officer with Dementia solve the death of his wife and an employee it just might happen. This is a must see show for all ages as both young and old can enjoy the show.

          2. clara.madrenas
            Subscriber
            says:

            This mix of social critique, goofy murder mystery and story of love & loss in the life of a man with early-stage Alzheimer’s aims high and mostly succeeds in being a witty, entertaining commentary on the way we treat our most vulnerable in society. Much of the social commentary is fairly on-the-nose, and some of the shifts between characters seemed dialed-in enough so as to make some personalities a bit too over the top. It’s likely, though, that you’ll still love this show–if not just for its relatable subject matter, its clever storyline, or its emotional notes, at the very least, one character’s persistent idiomatic mix-ups alone are worth the price of admission.

            ****

          3. Bob Klanac
            Reviewer
            says:

            Rob Gee knows dementia and Alzheimer’s first-hand by way of working in a hospital ward for a number of years. What’s uncanny about Forget Me Not is how he delivers a 360 degree look at the entire environment from ward attendants to doctors to the patients and their family members.

            That would be enough given Gee’s mastery of inhabiting the various personalities and the differing perspectives of each. In fact for the first part of the play, it’s entirely enough, as he deftly transitions from one character to the next, delivering the laughs and sad truths of his troupe of unreliable narrators.

            But when a murder happens on the ward, the tone shifts, the laughs leavened by the growing sadness of why the murder happened.

            By the time Forget Me Not resolves the murder, Gee has reminded all that, yes, dementia and Alzheimer’s is a cruel disease but also that their lives matter despite the inability to create new memories.

            And that not remembering loved ones one day, means meeting them and falling in love again the next.

            Forget Me Not is a wonderful example of great writing and acting dovetailing to create an all too believable world, where the inherent sadness of lives coming to an end is not without moments of poetry and a vivid reminder that all lives have value and meaning.

            *****

          4. Jeanne Jones says:

            The best show that I have seen so far of 7. Funny, very well performed and a serious point to make. My second main take away is that I definitely could never work in one of those wards. Total respect to those (including Robert Gee) who can do it and respect their patients.

          5. Jay Ménard
            Reviewer
            says:

            Forget Me Not: Entertaining, but Not Overly Memorable

            Rob Gee brings a unique perspective to the stage, as a comic, poet, and psychiatric nurse in Forget Me Not — the Alzheimer’s Whodunnit. Gee is eminently appealing, genuinely funny at times, and clearly a clever writer. The play itself is a pleasant diversion — it has moments of uproarious humour at times, but also devolves into repetition at times. It’s funny, entertaining, but — at the end of it — it’s not something that’s going to stay with you.

            The story focuses on a series of unexplained and apparently violent deaths on a dementia ward. Gee embodies multiple characters through the play and gives them all their own physicality and voice. It’s a classic whodunnit, seen primarily through the eyes of a former police officer who, himself, is suffering from Alzheimer’s.

            The best part of the play comes from Gee’s detective character, brought in to solve the murders. He masterfully mixes up common idioms in rapid-fire fashion and draws laughs from the crowd. Unfortunately, like many of the tropes in this play, it goes on one too many times. It’s hilarious the first time, funny the second, but by the third time, we’re ready to move on.

            There’s a moment, at the end, of incredible poignancy, but it’s delivered as a bit of black humour and not given the attention it deserves. It feels like a missed opportunity to hammer home, in an entertaining way, the challenges we face with how we treat our aging population.

            Overall, Forget Me Not is enjoyable. It’s just not particularly memorable.

            ***

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