Your Princess is in Another Castle

Princess Polly loses the vote for Miss Leader of the Free World to a Department Store Mannequin. A Prince Charming Type knows he can save you, if only you would listen. A dark comedy of errors.

June
  1. Sun
  2. Mon
  3. Tue
  4. Wed
  5. Thu
  6. Fri
  7. Sat
  1. 1
    1. 8:30 pm
      Your Princess is in Another Castle

      See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/your-princess-is-in-another-castle/ for details.

      Location: Procunier Hall

  2. 2
    1. 3
      1. 1:00 pm
        Your Princess is in Another Castle

        See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/your-princess-is-in-another-castle/ for details.

        Location: Procunier Hall

    2. 4
      1. 6:30 pm
        Your Princess is in Another Castle

        See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/your-princess-is-in-another-castle/ for details.

        Location: Procunier Hall

    3. 5
      1. 7:00 pm
        Your Princess is in Another Castle

        See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/your-princess-is-in-another-castle/ for details.

        Location: Procunier Hall

    4. 6
      1. 7
        1. 9:15 pm
          Your Princess is in Another Castle

          See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/your-princess-is-in-another-castle/ for details.

          Location: Procunier Hall

      2. 8
        1. 6:30 pm
          Your Princess is in Another Castle

          See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2017/06/your-princess-is-in-another-castle/ for details.

          Location: Procunier Hall

      3. 9
        1. 10

          Location: Procunier Hall

          3 thoughts on “Your Princess is in Another Castle”

          1. Jeffrey Preston
            Reviewer
            says:

            As the performers announce before their premiere performance, this show is more workshop than polished performance. But don’t let that scare you away from a really interesting story that interrogates the social media-ification of our vacuous culture and political systems. While I was skeptical at first of “workshopping” a show live, Kenny and Babcock really pulled this together and delivered an experience that truly made the audience feel a part of the creative process as opposed to merely taking something public too early. A raw show driven by meta humour, social criticism and quick wit, this show embodies the spirit of Fringe and delivers an experience different than you will find on a mainstream stage.

            If you’re wanting to get into something on the ground floor and watch the evolution of a play being born, this could be something you won’t want to miss!

            ****

          2. Jay Ménard
            Reviewer
            says:

            London Fringe — Your Princess is in Another Castle, but the Castle is Still Just a Facade

            Before the play starts, Wes Babcock explains to the crowd that Your Prince is in Another Castle is very much a work in progress. He and Nancy Kenny, known for Roller Derby Saved my Soul and Everybody Dies in December, are workshopping this production and that honesty is greatly appreciated, because the production is very, very rough.

            Ostensibly, the play is about Princess Polly, who loses the vote for Miss Leader of the Free World — the elections are won and lost by reality television. She finds herself a barista in a coffee shop run by her mannequin boyfriend. And Polly feels she lost the election because she was unable to make the mannequin population care for her.

            There are elements of an interesting story here. The first building blocks of a foundation upon which something entertaining may arise. But right now, the drywall’s been applied a little haphazardly, the windows are slapdash, and the decorations are a little gaudy. It needs work and refinement to be something a little more stage-worthy.

            The clear Trump-isms are a little heavy handed and obvious. The females-in-politics-should-be-seen-and-not-heard theme is hammered home ad nauseam — with no actual resolution or payoff. And for a character that’s supposed to be dripping with smarmy charm and charisma, Babcock’s “poet laureate” is incredibly stiff and wooden.

            There are moments when the dialogue hangs in the air, waiting for someone to pick up the next piece. There are times when scene awkwardly end or transitions seem forced. And there are themes that are introduced but not fully explored.

            Again, this is just a workshop, so it’s an entertaining way to be part of the process. And maybe in a couple of years this will be a tight, biting social commentary. But right now, it’s a show that lacks both head and heart — it is, to be honest, a mannequin framework of a story. But every mannequin is loaded with potential and perhaps this one shine in the future.

            **

          3. Jeanne Jones says:

            Finding the idea of the show intriguing in the Showcase, the concept was even more pertinent to me when I went to see the show. It particularly struck a cord because of a documentary analyzing Trump and his support through interviews with reality TV’s producers (spoiler alert: right or wrong does not matter in reality TV: it is all about what gets the biggest audience, the most attention – maybe, obvious to people to watch ‘reality TV’ but I am not one of that number).

            The show was humorous and relevant. It could use some polish and Babcock could be less wooden but I hope that one day I can see the finished show.

          Comments are closed.