AWKWARD HUG

Award-winning actor, writer and storytelling champion Cory Thibert, embodies his 19-year-old self as he uncovers the truth behind what sets his family apart in this coming-of-age story with a twist.

Hilarious. Honest. Impactful.

The June 2 performance will be ASL interpreted.

May
  1. Sun
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  3. Tue
  4. Wed
  5. Thu
  6. Fri
  7. Sat
  1. 27
    1. 28
      1. 29
        1. 30
          1. 5:30 pm
            AWKWARD HUG

            See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/05/awkward-hug/ for details.

            Location: Spriet Family Theatre

        2. 31
          June
          1. Sun
          2. Mon
          3. Tue
          4. Wed
          5. Thu
          6. Fri
          7. Sat
          1. 1
            1. 7:30 pm
              AWKWARD HUG

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/05/awkward-hug/ for details.

              Location: Spriet Family Theatre

          2. 2
            1. 8:00 pm
              AWKWARD HUG

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/05/awkward-hug/ for details.

              Location: Spriet Family Theatre

          3. 3
            1. 4
              1. 5:30 pm
                AWKWARD HUG

                See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/05/awkward-hug/ for details.

                Location: Spriet Family Theatre

            2. 5
              1. 6
                1. 7
                  1. 5:00 pm
                    AWKWARD HUG

                    See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/05/awkward-hug/ for details.

                    Location: Spriet Family Theatre

                2. 8
                  1. 9
                    1. 8:00 pm
                      AWKWARD HUG

                      See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/05/awkward-hug/ for details.

                      Location: Spriet Family Theatre

                  Location: Spriet Family Theatre

                  Cast

                  Artistic Credits

                  Direction:

                  3 thoughts on “AWKWARD HUG”

                  1. Melony Holt
                    Reviewer
                    says:

                    Who we are today is, in part, a product of the family we are born with and the people we choose to associate with. In Awkward Hug, Cory Thibert shares some of the people and experiences that have brought him to where he is today — quirks and all.

                    As the audience enters the theatre, Thibert greets it and chats with people in the front row. Then, seamlessly, we enter the world of 19-year-old Cory. He begins by giving great detail of how he navigated the social and sexual encounters throughout his awkward time of life. Though the timeline jumps as the story warrants, there is a consistent countdown to an impending move for Thibert and his parents, to which we are repeatedly brought back.

                    The narrative is beautifully crafted, with ebbs and flow between humour and heartache. Thibert effortlessly illustrates his world to the audience through verbal descriptions that perfectly capture the moment. The audience is made to feel like extras in a teen romcom at points.

                    We learn that Thibert’s parents have lifelong disabilities and he shares stories of experiences and perceptions that he experienced as a child of parents with disabilities. He shared how his parents have exceeded the expectations that others placed upon them, and how he learned from them how to live life to its fullest. He plainly and honestly discussed the stigmas, not for looking for pity or empathy, but rather simply serving to humanize his parents not just as people with disabilities, but as his parents — quirky, reserved, but fully experiencing life.

                    Thibert also discusses a nightmarish ex-girlfriend, a supportive best friend, and his older brother.

                    As a child of the 90s, I found much of the play’s setting relatable — likely due to the fact that I think I’m close to Thibert’s age. And the feeling seemed to be shared, as I could hear other audience members gasp or burst into joyful snickers throughout the show. Some were similar ages, others were not, but Thibert’s skill in finding relatable points of reference allowed us all to be drawn into the experience. Thibert was even able to make a screamo band at a house party seem touching.

                    Thibert is thoughtful, confident, and a charismatic storyteller whose presence fills the Spriet Theater.

                    As Thibert’s story is partly about disabilities — and it’s clearly a topic that’s close to his heart — his June 2nd performance at 8 p.m. will feature an American Sign Language interpreter.

                    4 out 5 stars

                    ****

                  2. Debra Tilley says:

                    We Done Melony.

                  3. dale blake says:

                    Excellent. Loved all of it!!!

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