Rebellion

The Dance Movement returns to the London Fringe with a spectacularly bold and ambitious production celebrating the rebellious spirit living within us.  Fearless and irrepressible but also vulnerable and fragile, Rebellion is an energetic exploration of insubordination and revolt in modern culture.

May
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  1. 27
    1. 28
      1. 29
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          1. 31
            1. 9:30 pm
              Rebellion

              See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/05/rebellion/ for details.

              Location: Palace Theatre

          June
          1. Sun
          2. Mon
          3. Tue
          4. Wed
          5. Thu
          6. Fri
          7. Sat
          1. 1
            1. 2
              1. 4:30 pm
                Rebellion

                See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/05/rebellion/ for details.

                Location: Palace Theatre

            2. 3
              1. 7:00 pm
                Rebellion

                See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/05/rebellion/ for details.

                Location: Palace Theatre

            3. 4
              1. 5:30 pm
                Rebellion

                See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/05/rebellion/ for details.

                Location: Palace Theatre

            4. 5
              1. 6
                1. 5:30 pm
                  Rebellion

                  See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/05/rebellion/ for details.

                  Location: Palace Theatre

              2. 7
                1. 8
                  1. 8:30 pm
                    Rebellion

                    See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/05/rebellion/ for details.

                    Location: Palace Theatre

                2. 9

                  Location: Palace Theatre

                  4 thoughts on “Rebellion”

                  1. Jay Ménard
                    Reviewer
                    says:

                    Rebellion — An Overwrought Vision Obscures the Most Important View

                    If one could focus exclusively on the dance and tune everything else out, Rebellion would be an excellent dance show. The performers, from The Dance Movement, execute the choreography beautifully. They are strong dancers as an ensemble, performing flawless synchronization when called for, and standing out as individuals when given the chance.

                    Unfortunately, direction and production decisions makes it impossible to tune the others out. And the dancers are obscured by directorial decisions that are implemented with all the subtlety of a sledgehammer. The performance suffers as a result and the dancers are the victims of the decisions.

                    The show bills itself as “an energetic exploration of insubordination and revolt in modern culture.” And instead of letting the dance speak for itself, Rebellion makes sure to hammer home that theme at each and every point.

                    School shootings, nuclear war, social media isolation, mental health, racism, our place in modern society — all are presented. It’s not fair to say they were explored, because that would insinuate a progressive exploration. Instead, the themes are blasted to the audience with all the subtlety of a flashing neon light.

                    It often seems like the spoken word elements are more important than the actions of the dancers. Frequently, the dancers are obscured and rendered as secondary — or even tertiary (when you factor in lighting) elements of the show. At one point, dancers are rendered stationary props for a speech by former President Barack Obama. In a section where the speech implores us to go beyond the superficiality of social media and embrace unique, individual relationship, all the dancers are obscured by lighting — rendering them an faceless, anonymous mass, as opposed to celebrating the very individuality that we’re being encouraged to do. And the overuse of the slowly raised fist effect descends into self-parody. We are encouraged to listen to the words, more then letting the dancers speak for themselves — and that’s a shame.

                    It’s too bad because the dancers are extremely talented. Based on dance alone, this is a four-star show and there are a number of performers and performances that would be worthy of being highlighted. Unfortunately, they’re not given the opportunity to take centre stage because an overwrought vision gets in the way of the view.

                  2. Ranulf Glanville says:

                    Clearly, beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

                    I saw Rebellion and thoroughly enjoyed it. It seemed very well received by the others in the audience as well.

                    While the reviewer is entitled to his opinions, of course, I wanted to comment on something I thought was implicit in the review: Rebellion is dance.

                    To me, within the context of the Fringe Festival, Rebellion is intended as art, not “just dance”. If the dancers are “obscured” it was probably intentional. If the dancers are “stationary” – or absent for the stage altogether for a few moments – that was likely by design. If the lighting was low that was surely on purpose. If the dancers become “props” temporarily while a former President speaks what’s wrong with that as part of a larger presentation?

                    Whether or not you appreciate and value the art put on stage in Rebellion is subjective and open to debate. I would encourage people to approach viewing the show with an open mind, regardless of whether it’s performed by dancers or anyone else. I did – and I enjoyed it!

                  3. AliB says:

                    Rebellion was an incredible show.

                    Watching these dancers portray such important issues was an incredibly humbling experience for me… Finding out that the average age of these dancers was to be about high school age and younger was baffling and inspiring. The topics that were addressed in this show were so prevalent and so relatable and the fact that these dancers were so young had even more of an impact on me/ the audience. This show was not about showcasing the talents of the students of this particular studio, it was clearly created to be an incredible platform from which the dancers could have some sort of impact on the community in which they live, and the peers with whom they interact in their day to day lives.

                    “Rebellion” is not a show to watch if you’re expecting to see a typical dance recital. This show has clearly been put together by someone (or a group of people) who understand(s) what topics he/she/they is/are trying to cover and in turn, what audience he/she/they is/are trying to reach.

                    I believe (as a performer, dancer, teacher for more than a decade of my life) the director and the dancers/performers of this show have created something remarkable. I applaud the director, the performers, the stage crews, and everyone else that contributed to such an important piece of art. Congratulations, you are part of something bigger than what some people are incapable of understanding.

                  4. S.Kitching says:

                    CHANGE YOUR FOCUS…CHANGE YOUR PERSPECTIVE
                    Dance as an Art form is meant to evoke a raw, emotional response. Rebellion does just that- so many emotions and so many amazing moments. Through the layers of spoken word, music and dance, the dance artists find their voice through owning the movement. They take the power back through demonstrating power in team and power in trust and power in storytelling. The story is real. The struggles of this generation are real. The emotions are raw. The dancers capture all of the emotions and send them out to the audience. The artistic director’s vision and intention is for the audience to discover their own meaning – independent of her influence. We must filter through the layers of stimulus on stage just like the filtering through the layers of constant sensory stimulus and stress in our daily lives. Change your focus….change your perspective. I choose to focus on the beauty of the artistry, courage over fear, compassion over grief and joy over sadness. This extraordinary artistic director owned the story. These inspiring young dance artists owned their story, and owned the stage. Amazing !!!

                  Comments are closed.