Dog’s Misery Swamp

A crazy quilt of colliding obsessions: an idealistic con artist, a birdwatcher gone rogue, a billionaire with a foul fetish, a cryptic creature, and two guys in one pair of pants. In the horribly polluted swamp of a dying town, they’re all in hot pursuit of their lives’ holy grails!

June
  1. Sun
  2. Mon
  3. Tue
  4. Wed
  5. Thu
  6. Fri
  7. Sat
  1. 1
    1. 8:00 pm
      Dog’s Misery Swamp

      See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/06/dogs-misery-swamp/ for details.

      Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

  2. 2
    1. 3:00 pm
      Dog’s Misery Swamp

      See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/06/dogs-misery-swamp/ for details.

      Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

  3. 3
    1. 4
      1. 5:00 pm
        Dog’s Misery Swamp

        See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/06/dogs-misery-swamp/ for details.

        Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

    2. 5
      1. 9:30 pm
        Dog’s Misery Swamp

        See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/06/dogs-misery-swamp/ for details.

        Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

    3. 6
      1. 7
        1. 9:30 pm
          Dog’s Misery Swamp

          See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/06/dogs-misery-swamp/ for details.

          Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

      2. 8
        1. 9
          1. 4:00 pm
            Dog’s Misery Swamp

            See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/06/dogs-misery-swamp/ for details.

            Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

        1 thought on “Dog’s Misery Swamp”

        1. Alison Brown
          Reviewer
          says:

          Dog’s Misery Swamp: A comic tragedy or a tragic comedy?

          The playwright David Jacobson shines in this one-man show set in a small town dealing with an environmental disaster caused by industrial waste, thus the title “Dog’s Misery Swamp.” The town is populated with interesting characters: one-armed Uncle Jack, the war vet, and the main character, his nephew; a billionaire industrialist with an extremely bright daughter, Rapunzel, whom he tries to keep from going out by building her a lab and giving her a microscope. Rap, as the nephew calls her, is fascinated by bacteria, which happens to start the convoluted plot going with her ideas gleaned from studying its behaviour through the microscope.

          Each character, from the blind bird-watcher to Saint Helen Keller to the conjoined twin body guards, is aptly portrayed in voice and gesture by Jacobson, with no props. The plot is complex, with enough twists and turns to strain credulity at times, but the opening night audience seemed right with him to the end of the eighty-five minute show.

          The plot is driven by the story of bacteria, the good and the bad, and the show’s website lists various resources for further study. If you see the show (even if you don’t), be sure to check out his website.

          Jacobson has managed to weave complex science into an engaging story that will make you interested in learning more about bacteria. I sense that Jacobson could write a full-length play and with Dog’s Misery Swamp, he has given us a mere taste of what is yet to come.

          His play is an extraordinary display of intelligence and entertainment and I recommend that you make the time to see it at The Arts Project.

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