The ADHD Project

Storyteller Carlyn Rhamey shares the trials and triumphs of growing up a little bit “special” and embracing what makes us different. Enter her world of chaos, creativity and combat with her mind.

Ottawa Emerging Artist Award 2017

★★★★ “CAPTIVATING” OnStage Ottawa

“Rhamey takes it to a higher level” ArtsAlly Hamilton

June
  1. Sun
  2. Mon
  3. Tue
  4. Wed
  5. Thu
  6. Fri
  7. Sat
  1. 1
    1. 5:00 pm
      The ADHD Project

      See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/06/the-adhd-project/ for details.

      Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

  2. 2
    1. 9:00 pm
      The ADHD Project

      See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/06/the-adhd-project/ for details.

      Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

  3. 3
    1. 4
      1. 7:00 pm
        The ADHD Project

        See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/06/the-adhd-project/ for details.

        Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

    2. 5
      1. 6
        1. 5:00 pm
          The ADHD Project

          See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/06/the-adhd-project/ for details.

          Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

      2. 7
        1. 8
          1. 5:00 pm
            The ADHD Project

            See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/06/the-adhd-project/ for details.

            Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

        2. 9
          1. 8:00 pm
            The ADHD Project

            See https://theatreinlondon.ca/2018/06/the-adhd-project/ for details.

            Location: TAP Centre for Creativity

        4 thoughts on “The ADHD Project”

        1. Jay Ménard
          Reviewer
          says:

          The ADHD Project is a wonderfully told story of Carlyn Rhamey’s life with ADHD. It’s a story that’s filled with warmth, humour, a touch of sadness, and hefty dose of uplifting messaging that combines to have you fall in love with the story and the storyteller alike.

          It’s hard not to like Rhamey. She’s vibrant, engaging, and fills the room with the force of her personality and joy. She punctuates many lines with a wonderfully expressive face and body language — which makes her moments of sadness and melancholy all the more jarring. Her story is crafted in such a way that we feel her highs and lows, and are not mere spectators, but partners in her quest to understand who she is, how her brain works, and where she fits in a society that’s all too quick to put people with ADHD in a box.

          Rhamey weaves multiple characters throughout her story. She talks about her relationship with her parents and siblings, impersonates bullies and “friends” whom she encounters along the way, and even takes a stab at replicating the French accent of her collegiate disability services councillor (though, to be fair, her “French” has a healthy dose of Tony Montana-era Pacino in it — and, to also be fair, she’s fully aware of her French “prowess.”)

          The story begins and centres around her Grade Three and Four years, where she’s transitioned out of the general class and into a “Spec Ed” program. She shares the good and the bad — the former being the individualized support she received; the latter being the isolation inflicted by a youth culture that’s quick to exclude — or worse — anyone that’s deemed different.

          She then proceeds through subsequent years — from discovering performing in later elementary school (complete with a Dopey-inspired epiphany — trust me on this one), to finding her way through high school and college. To eventually discovering her dual passions of theatre and supporting the educational needs of people with disabilities.

          In the end, Rhamey finds a way to reconcile the good and the bad of her neurodiversity, and provides wonderful encouragement for those either living with neurodiversity — or living with someone with neurodiversity. And whether you’ve had personal experience with it or not, it’s a story that at once opens the mind and touches the heart.

          ****

        2. Ibrahim Ng says:

          Attention and distraction are generally taken for granted. The average person can focus while accepting that diversion is inevitable. But The ADHD Project’s main character is someone with a mental disorder where concentration and inattention are constantly in flux, turning tasks like paperwork or parking into desperate quests of frustration and hilarity.

          This one-woman show is a series of autobiographical anecdotes presented by Carlyn Rhamey who plays her stories for laughs while still presenting the aggravation of enduring them. Rhamey demonstrates astonishing skill as she babbles through her biography with a seemingly stream-of-consciousness style that’s always intelligible and lands every joke. Her timing is perfect even with a mental disorder that impedes timing; that’s how good she is! The script criss-crosses between time periods with crisp transitions that anchor the audience for each tale.

          Throughout the show, Rhamey presents her life as a lighthearted trainwreck. Losing a car is amusing instead of frantically terrifying. Humiliation is dismissed with a wisecrack. Being bullied is one bullet-point on a lengthy list of concerns. The constant sense of loss – losing time, losing opportunity, losing hope, losing possibilities – is omnipresent.

          While this one-woman show primarily depends on Rhamey’s voice and physicality, there are multimedia segments: family videos of her childhood are projected on a screen and shown with psychological assessments and reports on her educational accommodations. These brief additions are enlightening: the onstage Carlyn is a vivid, endearing creation, but the videos show a child either hyperactive or drained and the paperwork describe her through a lens of deficiency and impairment, adding darkness and hardship to the antics onstage.

          There are a few moments where Rhamey permits Carlyn to be in in genuine distress and she truly excels at presenting the panicked, agonizing terror of her brain and body feeling outmatched by the demands of the world around her.

          As Carlyn battles for her academic future and to prove her value as a human being, Rhamey presents a darker, almost despairing tone that adds tremendous dramatic weight and the most impressive aspect of The ADHD Project is how a contradictory mental disorder is presented with clarity and detail, providing an education while still being this specific person’s story.

        3. Alison Brown
          Reviewer
          says:

          Living with ADHD is Fun (Sometimes)

          Storyteller Carlyn Rhamey shares her experiences with a personal assistant (her brain) that doesn’t process information in typical way. Her account of her life with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is no pity party, but a celebration of who she is with all of her foibles and self-compassion. Her awareness of the difficulties of living with ADHD helps us see that it is a different style of processing information in the brain rather than a disorder. Her story moves us as we identify with the lack of understanding she has encountered in her life. Last evening’s audience showed with their laughter and their tears that she is loved and admired for her spirited life and her ability to get up on the stage and speak about it with honesty and eloquence. A captivating story that shouldn’t be missed!

        4. Heather May says:

          Thoroughly enjoyed it!
          Human, genuine and heartfelt.
          Loved it.

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